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WHAT WE DO

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WHAT WE DO

If we want wildlife in our world, conservation efforts must work for the local communities who share their environment with wildlife.

Wildlife Works was founded in 1997 to change the model of conservation from a colonial-era fortress model where people are seen as apart from nature, to a community-centered model where people are leading solutions as part of nature. Starting with an eco factory at our Kasigau project, we channeled marketplace finance to the forest communities for their own conservation and development plans. 

 

Currently, we are a leader in using REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation) to drive millions of dollars directly to Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities for their self-determined development and forest conservation. Over our 25+ year history in developing market-based conservation projects, Wildlife Works has found REDD+ to be the most effective and scalable way to protect forests.

 

Our success is based on ensuring forest communities get paid for keeping their forests intact. Communities' payment comes in the form of   unprecedented funding for jobs and   infrastructure, and direct revenue for social programs, health care, education, and other forest and wildlife friendly development.

 

Wildlife Works is committed to local communities having equal decision making power. Because local communities live on the frontlines of climate change and deforestation pressures, they must be in the driver’s seat when designing solutions for conservation. 

The strength of our projects is grounded in direct management: we have hundreds of local employees at each of our projects and in-house technical, social and biodiversity teams at the regional and global level.

 

Our exclusive sales company partner, Everland, works with large companies and our partner Stand for Trees manages consumer and small to medium size business purchases.

 

Our direct connection to the forest and the marketplace allows us to maximize revenue and inclusion for  Indigenous Peoples and local communities. 

By applying our community-centered conservation strategy to the carbon market, Wildlife Works has become a leading developer of high quality avoided deforestation REDD+  credits.

WE ARE A LEADER

SCIENCE-BACKED METHODOLOGY

Wildlife Works delivered the world’s first certified avoided deforestation REDD+ credits with the Kasigau Corridor REDD+ Project. 
 
We authored the methodology for avoided ecosystem conversion, widely used by REDD+ projects the world over for accreditation with the verified carbon standard (VCS) and continue to develop new technologies for REDD+ monitoring, reporting and verification.​
 
In collaboration with a group of best-in-class DRC Project practitioners and members of DRC civil society, we have developed  Best Practice REDD+ Private Sector Project Implementation Framework report, which  is the first in-depth guidance for the development of high-quality REDD+  projects in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).
 
Wildlife Works has helped develop over 10% of avoided deforestation VCS registered REDD projects and is the top REDD+ project developer in Africa.

​SCIENCE-BACKED METHODOLOGY
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COMMUNITY, FOREST & BIODIVERSITY

The Kasigau Corridor REDD+ project was awarded the additional distinction of gold-level status by the Climate, Community & Biodiversity Alliance (CCB) for exceptional biodiversity and climate benefits.​

Our projects support the health of the entire wildlife and human ecosystem for environmental protection and economic growth.​​

 

Our projects have driven  a  transformative     amount  of finance directly  to our local community    partners.

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STAKEHOLDER TRUST & COLLABORATION

​We have applied over 25 years of professional direct field management and cultural competency that puts communities first  . As a result, we establish deep trust and transparency with the local communities, which allows us to  react to challenges with place and culture specific solutions.

We have become trusted consultants to governments interested in developing jurisdictional programs and national REDD+ frameworks for nesting. We facilitated the ERPA signing between the World Bank FCPF Carbon Fund and the Government of the DRC, making the Mai Ndombe ER Program the first program in the world to make it through the World Bank pipeline to nest a project within a jurisdictional program.​​​

 

Exceptional sales strategy through Everland Marketing that identifies and builds long-term relationships with climate-ambitious corporate customers and investors.

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WHY

WHY WE DEVELOP MARKET-BASED SOLUTIONS

Our rights-based approach to market-based conservation protects threatened forests and wildlife by driving economic development to forest communities.

We develop market-based conservation projects because the causes of deforestation are fundamentally economic; trees are cut down because it is more profitable than leaving them standing. 

 

To conserve our planet’s vital ecosystems, protecting forests must be valued more than destroying and extracting from them.

Traditionally, conservation has relied on philanthropy and public funding. In order to replace the economic forces that drive a community or country towards deforestation, they have to have access to sustainable economic alternatives. Our business model offers a market-based solution that embeds community development into wildlife conservation.

WHY REDD+

At Wildlife Works, we have implemented REDD+ to pay forest communities for their essential service of protecting our planet’s forests.

Until REDD+, forest communities received little to no compensation for stewarding our world’s ecosystems, even though these forests provide a priceless amount of benefits to the global economy through ecosystem services. Paying forest communities for their critical work is essential to reach our global climate goals and is a form of environmental justice.

​Our community-centered way of working will continue to be our guiding light as we develop other market opportunities that protect the worlds’ precious biodiversity.

WHY
NATURE-BASED

SOLUTIONS

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WHY

WE PROTECT FORESTS

& BIODIVERSITY

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WHY
COMMUNITIES

MUST LEAD

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OUR PROCESS

COMMUNITY SELF-DETERMINATION AND LEADERSHIP

FORESTRY, BIODIVERSITY SCIENCE

TRANSPARENCY AND

CO-CREATION

IS IT POSSIBLE TO BALANCE THE URGENCY OF CLIMATE ACTION WITH RESPECT FOR  FOREST COMMUNITY SELF-DETERMINATION

​This is not charity. Carbon money helps us meet basic needs and improve your lifestyle. The money earned through conservation activities affords us the ability to protect our environment and develop as we see it.

Chief Kizaka

KASIGAU, KENYA

INTERESTED IN A CAREER WITH US?

  • Wildlife Works selects REDD+ projects based on an evaluation of the world’s most threatened forests and wildlife. Working with governments and Indigenous territories across regions, we help identify areas in need of economically viable solutions to end deforestation. We employ hundreds of local employees at each project, and work closely with communities to protect forests and wildlife, while respecting their right to self-determination.

    While implementing project activities, we monitor deforestation using scientifically validated methodologies, both in the project area and in the surrounding “leakage” area. This ensures that any deforestation activity that is displaced to other, less well protected areas as a result of the project’s activities is fully accounted for. We also monitor and report on the project’s net impacts on wildlife and communities.

    Independent auditors evaluate our project’s monitoring data and visit the field to verify results. Emissions reductions are credited to the project for a monitoring period only after auditors have independently verified the project’s performance for that period.

    All of our projects are certified by leading standards bodies. The Climate, Community & Biodiversity (CCB) Program is the leading framework for assessing projects that simultaneously address climate change, support local communities and smallholders, and conserve biodiversity. Verra is currently the leading body for verifying that emissions reductions generated by carbon reduction projects, including from REDD+, are real, measurable, additional and permanent.

     

    Our Commitments to Implement REDD+:

    •  Community self-determination: We partner equitably with community members and their chosen leaders to facilitate community-led, democratic decision making, with fluid and continual FPIC (Free and Prior Informed Consent) procedures throughout the entire lifecycle of the project. To establish and / or reinforce a governance system for the project that is fair, equitable, and representative of the diversity within the community, we facilitate the creation of Local Carbon Committees (LCCs). LCCs consist of a diverse coalition of voted-in representatives from each village to bring community-wide concerns and requests to Wildlife Works’ project managers.

    • Transparency: We are third party verified and all of our audit reports are made public. Learn more about our approach.

    •  Accountability: For the projects we own (Kasigau and Mai Ndombe), we operate them directly so that we can be fully accountable. We conduct annual community surveys to receive first hand feedback on our programs and have an open door policy with community members to share grievances or requests.


    In order to uphold these commitments, we manage the entire lifecycle of REDD+ projects, from feasibility to verification to sales. Each REDD+ project is managed directly by Wildlife Works employees who are embedded in the community and culture of the project areas’ forest communities.

    For more detailed information, head to “OUR PROCESS” section of this page.

  • When we are looking to start a new project, our team asks the following questions:

    • Are there forest communities who are looking for new, sustainable revenue sources that either replace extraction or fund their forest’s continued protection?

    • What is the threat to the forest and wildlife?

    • How has forest loss historically impacted this community?

    • Do communities have land ownership, customary rights, land tenure and or carbon rights?

    • What governance structures does the community have in place to enable a thorough and democratic Free and Prior Informed Consent (FPIC) process?

    • Do existing development partners in the area have a respected reputation with local communities?

    • How biodiverse and carbon-rich is this region?

    • What is the size of the forest?
       

    Want to start a project?  Contact us.

  • Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) is a process that allows local communities to give or withhold consent to a project that may affect them or their territories (FAO, 2016).

     

    Our FPIC process is consistent with the Cancun safeguards for REDD+ projects defined by the UNFCCC, which "constitute general principles that not only help ensure that REDD+ policies and measures do not cause harm to people and the environment, but also that they have positive effects and enhance social and environmental benefits."

     

    Wildlife Works considers FPIC to be a continuous process, and it is critical to each phase of our projects.Some key features of our FPIC process include:

    • We conduct a comprehensive evaluation of the risks to, and potential (negative) impacts on, various stakeholders and proposed mitigation plans.

    • We provide communities with complete information on the purpose, nature, scale and duration of the project activities

    • This includes information on the planned stakeholder engagement process (e.g., times and venues of public consultation meetings), grievance-registering and management procedures, and opportunities and means by which they can participate.

    • We conduct thorough FPIC during the feasibility phase, before any contracts are signed to establish the project. Our FPIC process includes conducting extensive community outreach and sensitization to community members, in a user-friendly and culturally fitting manner, free of manipulation, interference, coercion and intimidation. If the community partners agree to start the project, FPIC continues throughout the entire life cycle of the project.

    • We implement continuous and meaningful consultation with all project stakeholders, including marginalized groups within the local community.

    • We use an effective and culturally appropriate procedure for which people can provide feedback and complaints.

    • We provide communities with timely disclosure of appropriate information.
       

    Wildlife Works does not purchase land for new projects, and instead aims to strengthen the customary rights of local and Indigenous communities. The success of REDD+ projects depends in part on understanding local land tenure so the introduction of rights-based projects catalyzes clarification of land tenure rules where it is unclear. 

     

    We have a universal respect for human rights and freedoms, particularly to the basic human right to adequate shelter. Wildlife Works never engages in any project that involves forced eviction. Wildlife Works seeks to avoid all forms of physical resettlement and economic displacement when implementing our forest carbon projects.

     

    If communities are illegally occupying a protected area under the country’s law and economic or voluntary physical displacement becomes unavoidable, our policy is to seek full consent from the affected communities through the FPIC process and take appropriate measures to mitigate adverse impacts on displaced persons are carefully planned and implemented to adequately compensate them and restore their livelihoods at least to their previous level.

  • Carbon credits generated using a counterfactual scenario, such as avoided deforestation projects, depend heavily on the methodology used to determine risk in the business as usual scenario, i.e., the “baseline.” As with any scientific endeavor, Wildlife Works supports the continual update of accounting frameworks and methodologies for calculating baselines.

     

    Historically, baselines were calculated by analyzing the historical rate of deforestation in a reference area. Today, Wildlife Works calculates baselines through a risk map and baseline allocation technique. As the Voluntary Carbon Market (VCM) moves toward a nested approach, risk-based baseline allocation presents a way for host governments to use VCM finance to protect their forests while achieving their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) towards the Paris Agreement.

     

    Our methodology for determining baselines is practical and based on rigorous science. We analyze historical deforestation, develop predictive maps, and work with governments to identify areas that are at the highest risk of deforestation. Our projects are then allocated a reference level based on how much low and high-risk area is contained in the project boundaries. We prefer using information on forests reference emissions levels that governments submit to the   UNFCCC.

     

    By focusing on risk of future deforestation, performance incentive is concentrated where it is most needed. Risk-based allocations reflect real-world complexity, and are critical for the scaling needed to prevent global deforestation.

     

    For more information see:

    • VM0007  details calculating baselines for unplanned deforestation.

    • VM0009  details calculating baselines for planned deforestation.

    • Our   Best Practices Framework  for the DRC.

  • Our community-centered process to reach an agreement with IPLCs involves a feasibility study with robust FPIC procedures.

     

    Feasibility refers to the process by which Wildlife Works conducts a first visit to introduce the idea of a REDD+ project to a community.  If the community is interested in starting a project and decides that they want to learn more about how Wildlife Works develops REDD+ projects, a preliminary MOU is signed by the community’s legal representatives.

     

    The feasibility study includes in-depth information sharing sessions to ensure communities know about their rights, development options, and how REDD+ works. We engage with local facilitators, as they understand local cultures, nuances and languages to ensure proper exchange of information with the community. These outreach sessions are done in a manner that is culturally appropriate, free of manipulation, interference, coercion and intimidation.

     

    All meetings and memorandums of understanding are formally documented and signed.

     

    If the meetings with community members  show a likelihood of project success, we gather information on the potential logistics of the project. Wildlife Works and the communities join in technical, administrative and financial efforts to review and evaluate enabling conditions regarding property rights, forest cover, deforestation behavior, governance and community administration, among others.

     

    The contractual agreement to start the design of the project is signed by a legal representative with the express authorization of the communities. To avoid any intimidation or coercion, Wildlife Works employees are not present when consent forms are signed.

     

    This agreement establishes the start date of the project, the project area, the commercial conditions, the responsibilities and obligations of the parties, and the way in which income and payments will be handled.

  • Gathering Information and Setting up the Core Team

     

    As part of the continuous FPIC process, our local team works to gain in-depth knowledge from communities about their resource use, if and how resource use is changing, and to establish baseline socio-economic information. We undertake a participatory mapping exercise whereby traditional landowners indicate their territorial boundaries. Our in-house, technical carbon and biodiversity experts work to quantify carbon and identify the presence and population sizes of species present.

     

    SBIA Workshops and Defining Project Activities

     

    Social and Biodiversity Impact Assessment workshops provide a forum for community members to interact, exchange ideas and jointly determine the most critical issues affecting their area and lives, and how the proposed REDD+ project could help improve them. During these sessions, the Wildlife Works team and community participants develop theories of change for each focal issue, leading to the development of indicators and monitoring plans.

     

    Theories of change are causal models, which map out how a project intends to achieve its intended objectives. They are based on several assumptions about cause-and-effect relationships, and use various indicators to monitor the underlying assumptions’ validity. The impacts resulting from the model must be real, additional, and attributable. 

     

    LINK TO IMAGE

  • "This is not charity. Carbon money helps us meet basic needs and improve our lifestyle. The money earned through conservation activities affords us the ability to protect our environment and develop as we see fit." - Chief Kizaka, Kasigau Corridor REDD+ Project

     

    We strive to develop and implement fair, transparent and inclusive revenue sharing for all stakeholders across all our projects.

     

    Every project is unique, and the revenue sharing model depends on localized factors such as land tenure rights and the host government's policies and commitments to move toward a low carbon economy. Therefore, the revenue share model changes between each project, but is designed to maximize direct revenue to communities in each circumstance.

     

    This is why our target is for 50% or more of project revenue to  go directly to community partners and their development activities, and for 60% or more of project revenue to  stay in-country.

     

    We define a revenue sharing mechanism as the system for distributing both monetary and non-monetary gains generated through the implementation of our projects. We define monetary revenue sharing and non-monetary investments as:

    • Monetary revenue sharing:    monetary flows generated from the project’s credit sales shared with the community partners directly via salaries and benefits, local goods and services procurement, and sharing of revenue and/or profit - the percentages of which are negotiated and agreed upon by all stakeholders during the FPIC phase.

    • Non-monetary investments:  project activities paid by the project within its operating costs that fund livelihood enhancement, community development, capacity building, economic opportunities, or climate adaptation.
       

    All Wildlife Works’ projects involve the co-creation of a revenue-sharing plan. A proposed revenue-sharing plan is communicated to, and negotiated by, all project stakeholders involved in the FPIC process. With an agreed upon plan in place, Wildlife Works reports actual revenue distributions on a periodic basis throughout the lifetime of the project.

     

    To deliver the community’s revenue-share, Wildlife Works promotes the establishment of a  Local Development Fund  to provide a mechanism for channeling the revenue-share allocation to the community, which is used to implement the self-determined activities. These are supported by  Local Development Committees (LDC) which comprise of democratically voted in representatives who formulate the communities' Local Development Plans, also known as their Theory of Change, that guide project activity execution. Wildlife Works is guided by the following principles in supporting the operationalization of community benefits:

    • Transparency and downward accountability:  Besides providing oversight through the legally required oversight committees, the host country government and Wildlife Works create opportunities for the community to learn about finance and project management, as well as democratic governance of local institutions.

    • Review and adaptability:  The revenue sharing mechanism and allocations outlined above represent adaptable plans that are likely to evolve over the lifetime of a REDD+ project, as laws change and communities’ benefit management capacities grow. Thus, adaptive management principles are integrated in the benefit sharing plan, including designated timeframes, revision processes and continual consent-seeking from the community. This is to maintain high levels of fairness (especially to communities) and stability (especially for developers and investors).

  • Our project staff, the majority of whom are hired from the local community,  implement the activities communities have chosen, all of which are ultimately aimed at reducing deforestation. These activities may include co-developing sustainable jobs, conservation farming techniques, strengthening biodiversity monitoring programs, and building schools and clean water infrastructure. We work to build up regional capacity, and our in-house teams regularly collect data on the results of their efforts and publish this in annual monitoring reports.

     

    All verified projects must monitor deforestation using scientifically validated methodologies, both in the project area and in the surrounding “leakage” area – this ensures that deforestation that is displaced to other, less protected areas as a result of the project’s activities is fully accounted for. All of our projects are also  certified by the Climate, Communities, and Biodiversity (CCB) standard, which requires us to regularly monitor and report on our projects’ net impacts on wildlife and communities. Find links to the latest monitoring reports on our respective project pages.

  • Wildlife Works seeks to establish and maintain relationships built on mutual respect and trust with all stakeholders affected by our projects and their activities. Our guiding principles on stakeholder engagement are founded on a commitment to:

    • the wellbeing of community partners,

    • retaining an open mind and willingness to listen,

    • the resolution of conflicts and grievances in a constructive and transparent manner.
       

    Our work demands effective community outreach. Wildlife Works strives to employ individuals with the capacity and apt personality to develop and maintain good working relationships with all stakeholders, but especially local communities. As part of this, we cultivate Community Engagement and Outreach Departments at each project  to spearhead the stakeholder engagement process. Their primary mandate is to help sensitize the project to the community with regards to project activities, impacts, opportunities, and general updates.

     

    The Community Engagement and Outreach Department at each project employs a variety of methods to communicate information related to the project, depending on the target audience and the content of the message being delivered.

     

    These activities are designed to be culture and place specific and can include but are not limited to community (open air) meetings, themed sport tournaments, school education programmes, theater & art including short plays, dramas, folk songs, solo verses and poems, film shows, focus group discussions, workshop and seminars, and posters and flyers.

     

    Our on-the-ground teams also ensure a democratic decision-making structure is in place, which includes the effective participation of marginalized groups (women, youth and elderly, minority ethnic and religious groups,disabled persons and LGBTQI, if self-identified) within forest communities. This rigorous process builds trust and capacity in the communities, who take ownership of their projects. The process guarantees the projects’ permanence over time, ensuring that there are no misunderstandings, and sets the first guidelines for the revenue sharing system.

  • All Wildlife Works projects are validated and verified according to the CCB Standards. This further solidifies our commitment to community and stakeholder outreach. The standards require that:

    • Communities and Other Stakeholders are involved in the project through full and effective participation, including access to information, consultation, participation in decision-making and implementation, and Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC).

    • Timely and adequate information is made accessible in a language and manner understood by the Communities and Other Stakeholders.

    • Effective and timely consultations are conducted with all relevant stakeholders and participation is ensured, as appropriate, of those that want to be involved.

    • Feedback and Grievance Redress Procedures are established and functional.
       

    Independent auditors evaluate all of our projects’ monitoring data and visit the field to verify results. Emissions reductions are credited to the project for a monitoring period only after auditors have independently verified the project’s performance for that period. All audit reports are publicly available through the Verra website, ensuring full transparency.

WHAT IS REDD+

REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation) is a framework created by the UNFCCC Conference of the Parties (COP) to incentivize activities that Reduce Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation, plus the sustainable management, conservation and  enhancement of forest carbon stocks in developing countries. Forests play a large role in our ability to fight climate change because of the massive amount of carbon they emit when they’re degraded or cleared. By preventing deforestation and forest degradation, we can reduce these emissions and keep healthy ecosystems intact.

In the early 2000’s, global economists realized that unless developing Global South countries had economic alternatives to deforestation, they would quickly extract their natural resources as they raced to “catch up” with Global North countries. The United Nations developed the REDD+ framework to help build this alternative, and create a “win-win” situation; the world’s forests and their biodiversity remain intact, and developing countries receive compensation.

At Wildlife Works, we have implemented REDD+ in a way to pay forest communities for their essential service of protecting our planet’s forests. Until REDD+, forest communities received little to no compensation for stewarding our world’s ecosystems, even though these forests provide a priceless amount of benefits to the global economy through ecosystem services.

 

Paying forest communities for their critical work is a form of environmental justice.

​Our community-centered way of working will continue to be our guiding light as we develop other market opportunities that protect the worlds’ precious biodiversity.

FAQ

  • REDD+ stands for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation, plus the sustainable management of forests and the conservation and enhancement of forest stocks. Forests play a large role in our ability to fight climate change because of the massive amount of carbon they emit when they’re degraded or cleared. By preventing deforestation and   degradation, we can reduce these emissions and keep healthy ecosystems intact.

     

    Deforestation is a market-based problem, and we believe that market-based solutions can scale to the threat. REDD+ gives living a voice in the market, by giving them more financial value standing than cut down. This is done through the creation of carbon credit.  One carbon credit is equal to one metric ton of carbon dioxide. A metric ton of carbon dioxide is about the size of a  2 story house, and it’s the amount (rough estimate) of carbon that about  40 tropical rainforest trees  breathe in each year. Our REDD+ projects are monitored and verified by recognized third-party auditors to prove they have successfully used the best practices put forth by   international standards. The international standard bodies then issue Verified Emissions Reductions (VERs) that companies can buy if they want to make an impactful action to take accountability for the carbon impact of their business.

     

    In the early 2000’s, global economists realized that unless developing Global South countries had economic alternatives to deforestation, their natural resources would quickly be extracted as they raced to “catch up” with Global North countries. The   United Nations  developed the REDD+ framework to help build this alternative, and create a “win-win” situation; the world’s forests and their biodiversity remain intact, and developing countries receive compensation.

     

    At Wildlife Works, we have implemented REDD+ in a way to pay forest communities for their essential service of protecting our planet’s forests. Until REDD+, forest communities received little to no compensation for stewarding our world’s ecosystems, even though these forests provide a priceless amount of benefits to the global economy through   ecosystem services. Paying forest communities for their critical work is a form of environmental justice.

  • As defined by the United Nations, Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) is a specific right that pertains to indigenous peoples and is recognized in the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP). It allows them to give or withhold consent to any project that may affect them or their territories. Once they have given their consent, they can withdraw it at any stage. Furthermore, FPIC enables them to negotiate the conditions under which the project will be designed, implemented, monitored and evaluated.  This is also embedded within the universal right to self-determination.

  • The baseline is a calculation of the greenhouse gas emissions that would have occurred if the REDD+ project had never been implemented. This directly determines how many carbon credits can be generated from an avoided deforestation project.

    There are currently several different methods for calculating baselines such as through reference areas, synthetic controls, and risk-based maps with baseline allocations.

  • Additionality refers to proving the emission reductions would not have happened without the incentive of carbon credits. The emissions reductions achieved by protecting a forest need to be “additional” to what would have happened if one of our REDD+ projects had not been carried out.

  • Leakage is the increase of greenhouse gas emissions outside of the boundaries of projects, that can nonetheless be attributed back to the project. It is the phenomenon where deforestation activity shifts to another area after one is protected, thereby negating the positive effect of protecting the first area. The classic example of leakage is stopping a logging company from destroying one forest, only for it to move its activities down the road to another forest.

    Two types of leakage are broadly recognized: activity-shifting and market leakage. Activity-shifting leakage is measured at the local level and occurs when the agent(s) of deforestation and/or degradation move to an area outside of the project boundary, on account of the REDD+ Project, and continue deforestation and/or degradation activities there. Market leakage is measured at the national scale and occurs when the REDD+ project significantly reduces the production of a commodity, which through the laws of supply and demand, results in an increased level of production somewhere else in the country to replace the lost supply.

  • Emission reductions must represent a long-term mitigation benefit. There is inherent risk in reducing atmospheric carbon by storing it in trees, since the rate of forest fires is increasing with climate change.  We help ensure permanence with rigorous risk management plans that mitigate the risk of devastating events such as forest fires.

    Additionally, a portion of carbon credits generated by our projects are set aside and placed in a “buffer pool” instead of being sold. Buffer credits can be canceled from the pool if a “reversal” takes place, helping to ensure the integrity of previously issued credits.

"Wildlife Works is different from other organizations. What we do is community-based and community-oriented. Before undertaking any projects, we have to do public participation. This is very different from other people who just begin projects without asking what the community really requires."

​Seraphine Charo

MARUNGU LOCATION CARBON COMMITTEE REPRESENTATIVE WILDLIFE WORKS KASIGAU REDD+ PROJECT 

Wildlife Works implements economic solutions for wildlife conservation that drive measurable, direct finance to forest communities for their own development goals.

ARTICLE 01

ABOUT

OUR FOUNDER

Mike Korchinsky founded Wildlife Works in 1997 on the idea that if we want wildlife in our world, it has to work for local communities who share their environment and resources.

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ARTICLE 02

OUR

VALUES

We  are value-driven company committed to transparency and accountability.

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