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Wildlife Works develops forest conservation projects in partnership with communities who are safeguarding the most biodiverse ecosystems on Earth.

when conservation solutions are led by forest communities.

It is possible for wildlife and humans to thrive in harmony...

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OUR PILLARS

Wildlife Works’ holistic approach to conservation uses economic solutions to drive transformative levels of finance directly to forest communities for their own development goals.

Forest in the Democratic Republic of the Congo
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PRESERVE
FORESTS

Elephant in Kenya
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PROTECT
BIODIVERSITY

Farmers in Cambodia
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CENTER
COMMUNITIES

OUR COMMUNITY PARTNERS

Village Chief in Democratic Republic of the Congo

CHIEF BASABA BOOT'OMBALA
MAI NDOMBE, DRC

"Since we began working with Wildlife Works, I have started to recover everything I had lost.

 

The animals are coming back, and since our sacred sites are now protected from the logging company, I have regained my powers."

Man in Colombia

​GILDARDO CALDERÓN
PUTUMAYO, COLOMBIA

"We depend on Mother Earth in order to have the products we need for our families. That's why it is our duty to keep the territory healthy."

Female Farmer in Democratic Republic of the Congo

ANNE BOKUTU BOLEKOKA
MOTHER AND LOCAL FARMER

"The Wildlife Works project takes into account the issue of gender discrimination. There are great initiatives to engage women with sustainable agriculture.

 

Thanks to the revenue from this project, I was able to send my children to school."

Man in Democratic Republic of the Congo

ENGOKULU WANZA
COMMUNITY LEADER, DRC

"Logging companies destroyed our forest and scared the animals away with their noisy machines. Not even in the colonial times did we see the schools and clinics we have now. We've been forgotten."

Teacher in Democratic Republic of the Congo

ERASME MBOBA
TEACHER IN MPILI VILLAGE, DRC

"Us teachers have not been able to receive enough support from the state.

 

By partnering with Wildlife Works and protecting the forest, we have gained funds to build more schools."

Woman at the The Kasigau Corridor REDD+ Project in Kenya

GRACE   MWACHUGHA
KASIGAU CORRIDOR, KENYA

"Since Wildlife Works came in full swing to protect the forest and wildlife, charcoal production has decreased significantly. I am pleased to see that because the area has began to cool down, because trees help to regulate the temperature of the environment."

Village Chief at the Mai Ndombe REDD+ Project in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

CHIEF NKONSANGO NDALA
MAI NDOMBE, DRC

"We appreciate that Wildlife Works is committed for the long term, not like others who just donate individual items, like our old broken water pump, and then leave."

Village Chief in Indonesia

CHIEF MARTAWI

BATAMPANG VILLAGE, INDONESIA

Wildlife Works Indonesia ensures full transparency throughout the Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) process, which is crucial for the community.

GLOBAL IMPACTS

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1.8m

HECTARES OF FORESTS PROTECTED

53m

AVOIDED DEFORESTATION CREDITS ISSUED
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200k

COMMUNITY PARTNERS 
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66

IUCN ENDANGERED SPECIES PROTECTED
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HECTARE

One hectare is roughly equivalent to two football fields (10,000 square meters).

AVOIDED DEFORESTATION CARBON CREDITS

One carbon credit is equal to one metric ton of carbon dioxide. Avoided deforestation is defined as preventing deforestation by creating a change in policy, funding, actions, goals, etc. By stopping deforestation that would have happened if our projects did not exist, we can prevent carbon dioxide from entering the atmosphere. One metric ton of carbon dioxide is roughly equivalent to the amount of carbon dioxide that 40 mature tropical rainforest trees breathe in each year. However, each species of tree is different, and various environmental factors can affect this rate. That is why our on-the-ground teams meticulously work to analyze the amount of carbon in each of our project areas every year.

COMMUNITY PARTNERS

Community partners include all of the people who live in the project area and are impacted by project activities.

IUCN ENDANGERED SPECIES

The International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) is the leading authority on determining the conservation status of each species. After extensive research, species are listed on a scale of Not Threatened (NT) to Extinct (EX).

World Map of Wildlife Works Projects
Office in the United Kingdom
Office in
Vermont
Office in
North Carolina
Jaguar
3 REDD+ Projects in the Pacific Ecoregion of Colombia
Forest at the Mai Ndombe REDD+ Project in the Democratic Republic of the Congo
2 REDD+ Projects in Amazonian Colombia
Bird
Office in Panama
Lion in Kenya
Office in Cameroon
Giraffe in Kenya
Office in Tanzania
Orangutan
Office in Indonesia
Elephant
REDD+ Project:​Kasigau, Kenya
Bonobos
REDD+ Project:
Mai Ndombe, Democratic Republic of the Congo
Global Headquarters in California

GLOBAL PRESENCE

WATCH

THE WILDLIFE WORKS ORIGIN STORY
Wildlife Works was founded in 1997 with a mission to develop solutions for wildlife conservation which work for local communities.
POACHER TO PROTECTOR
The Mai Ndombe REDD+ Project in the DRC employs over 20 eco-guardians, many of whom are former poachers.
ABOUT THE MAI NDOMBE REDD+ PROJECT
The Mai Ndombe REDD+ Project protects 300,000 hectares of critical bonobo and forest elephant habitat within the world’s second-largest intact rainforest and some of the most important wetlands on the planet, the Congo Basin.
WATER IS LIFE
At the Kasigau Corridor REDD+ project in Kenya, community members are investing carbon revenue into improving access to water for all.
PORTRAIT OF A RANGER: CONNIE
At the Kasigau Corridor REDD+ project in Kenya, Connie Mwandaa has helped pave the way for female rangers.
ABOUT THE KASIGAU CORRIDOR REDD+ PROJECT
The Kasigau Corridor REDD+ project is the world’s first and longest standing certified REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation) project.
EYES ON THE FOREST: TRACKING THE RETURN OF ENDANGERED SPECIES
The Congo Basin is the second largest rainforest in the world, and serves as a last refuge for several endangered species. The density of this rainforest makes it difficult to track the status of these species, which raises the question: how can we protect these species if we don’t know who’s there?
THE GOOD DOCTOR
Communities use carbon revenue to build a hospital at the Mai Ndombe REDD+ Project in the DRC 

AS FEATURED IN

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Wildlife Works develops forest conservation projects in partnership with communities who are safeguarding the most biodiverse ecosystems on Earth.

when conservation solutions are led by forest communities.

It is possible for wildlife and humans to thrive in harmony...

Wildlife Works logo